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New Public Detroit Middle and High School School Accepting Applications for 2009-2010 School Year

by Donna Gundle-Krieg January 18, 2009

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A new middle and high school specializing in art, design, and creativity is accepting applications through February 27.

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies plans to open in fall 2009. It will be located at the historic Argonaut Building in the heart of Detroit's New Center, a few miles from downtown and Wayne State University.

 

The tuition free charter school will enroll 408 students in grades 6, 7 and 9 in its first year. At full enrollment, it plans to have 880 students in grades 6 through 12.

Philanthropists Bob and Ellen Thompson have committed up to $19 million to develop the facilities for the school. A few years ago, Detroit turned down Thompson’s offer of $200 million to build 15 charter high schools in Detroit, as they felt that he was “a white meddler out to steal their children,” according to Nolan Finley of the Detroit News.

Thompson hasn’t given up. The Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies stands to become a model for education, as an engine of urban economic development and minority outreach. The Detroit Academy has committed to graduating at least 90 percent of its students and sending at least 90 percent of graduates on to college. 

Henry Ford Academy: Dearborn, where the Henry Ford Academy educational reform model was first implemented, opened in 1997. It has a cumulative graduation rate of more than 90 percent; and 100 percent of its graduating classes of 2007 and 2008 were accepted to colleges and universities. 

This combination middle school and high school “gives hope for parents desperate to find alternatives instead of despair over the broken Detroit Public Schools,” according to Daniel Howes of the Detroit News.

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will draw on the strength of community partnerships to help all students achieve at high levels. It joins Chicago’s Henry Ford Academy: Power House High in the national network of small schools that are being built in America’s urban centers.

These schools are built with the support of local and national partners, including Ford Motor Company Fund, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Michigan Department of Education Charter School Program.  

For more information, see: The Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies  /  Are charter schools good for our children?  

 

 

January 9, 2009 Press Release

 College for Creative Studies and Henry Ford Learning Institute to Open  Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies in Detroit’s Historic Argonaut Building 

New Middle and High School Now Accepting Student Applications for the 2009-2010 School Year

 DETROIT, January 9, 2009. In anticipation of its opening in September 2009, Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies, Detroit’s new middle and high school of art, design and creativity, is now accepting student applications for the 2009-2010 school year. 

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies is being created to address the critical shortage of high-performing schools in the city, improve urban student achievement, and prepare students with an interest in art for a future in the dynamic and growing creative professions. 

A Web site launched today, January 9, 2009, provides families with more information about the public school academy’s focus, dates and locations of community information sessions, and a downloadable application. 

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies is being built on a solid foundation of experience. It is a partnership led by Detroit’s College for Creative Studies (CCS), a world leader in art and design education, and Henry Ford Learning Institute (HFLI), a non-profit organization founded by Ford Motor Company and The Henry Ford and dedicated to creating public schools in public spaces. 

The new middle and high school will combine the College’s educational resources with the nationally recognized education model first implemented at Henry Ford Academy in Dearborn, Mich., on the grounds of The Henry Ford, America’s Greatest History Attraction.

Henry Ford Academy: Dearborn, which opened in 1997, has a cumulative graduation rate of more than 90 percent; 100 percent of its graduating classes of 2007 and 2008 were accepted to colleges and universities.  

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies is part of a dramatic new vision for the College for Creative Studies that will enhance the College’s value as a significant community resource, a provider of career opportunity, and an engine for the development of a creative economy in the region and the continuing renewal of the City, said Richard Rogers, president of the College for Creative Studies. 

CCS, which has been developing art and design professionals for more than 100 years, announced expansion plans last summer that will redevelop the historic Argonaut Building, donated to it by General Motors, in Detroit’s New Center area as a cornerstone of Detroit’s creative economy. Students at Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will have the unique opportunity to learn and thrive in the Argonaut.s new integrated learning community, which will also include CCS undergraduate and graduate programs in design, community outreach activities, student housing, and research and professional activities in the design fields.   

Graduates of Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will be a step ahead of their peers.  Whether they want to be Advertising Designers, Comic Book Illustrators, Video Game Designers, Fashion Photographers, Animators, Automotive Designers or Product Designers, the Academy’s students will be well-tuned to succeed in their post-secondary art and design education and careers that require skills in the visual arts, said Rogers.

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies is different by design, with a unique approach that concentrates on engaging middle and high school students and preparing them for the future through strong academics, a college-going culture, intensive art and design preparation, and real world experiences that focus on innovation and creativity, said Deborah Parizek, executive director of Henry Ford Learning Institute.

Philanthropists Bob and Ellen Thompson have committed up to $19 million to develop the facilities for the school. As an achievement-focused Thompson Education Foundation 90/90 school and part of the Public School Academies of Detroit system, the Detroit Academy has committed to graduating at least 90 percent of its students and sending at least 90 percent of graduates on to college.  To reach these goals, the Academy in Detroit will provide strong academics and a supportive environment, where hands-on, project-based learning is led by highly qualified teachers, college and career pathway exploration starts in 6th grade, and students receive targeted support for academic achievement.  

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will draw on the strength of community partnerships to help all students achieve at high levels.  It joins Chicago’s Henry Ford Academy: Power House High in the national network of small schools that HFLI is building in America’s urban centers with the support of local and national partners, including Ford Motor Company Fund, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Michigan Department of Education Charter School Program.  

Institutions and communities that host a Henry Ford Academy can create a valuable asset that provides limitless opportunities, said Patricia Mooradian , president of The Henry Ford, which founded Henry Ford Academy in 1997 in partnership with Ford Motor Company. The school is located on the campus of this world premiere history destination.

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will demonstrate that all students can achieve at high levels, and that innovation and creativity is something that can and should be taught. Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies will serve 408 students in grades 6, 7 and 9 in its first year and scale to 880 students in grades 6 through 12 at full enrollment.

The Academy in Detroit is accepting applications through February 27, 2009, from students who are Michigan residents and eligible to enter the 6th, 7th, or 9th grades for the 2009-2010 school year. If student demand exceeds available space, admission will be determined by random lottery. 

All enrolled students will attend tuition-free.  Interested families are encouraged to attend community information sessions, visit the new Web site, or pick up a student enrollment application at a number of Detroit locations, including the College for Creative Studies Admissions and Administration Building (access via CCS alley off of John R, just south of Ferry St.), 201 E. Kirby St, Detroit, MI 48202-4034; Focus: HOPE, Main Center, 1400 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, MI 48238; and Latino Family Services, 3815 West Fort Street, Detroit, MI 48216.

For more information about information sessions or the application process, call (313) 664-7920 or email info@schoolforcreativestudies.org.  

About College for Creative Studies  

Located in midtown Detroit's Cultural Center, the College for Creative Studies is a world leader in art and design education and prepares students to enter the new, global economy where creativity shapes better communities and societies.

A private, fully accredited college, CCS enrolls over 1,300 students pursuing Bachelor of Fine Arts

degrees in Advertising Design, Art Education, Crafts, Entertainment Arts, Fine Arts, Graphic Design, Illustration, Interior Design, Photography, Product Design and Transportation Design. The College will award the Master of Fine Arts Degree in Design and in Transportation Design. The College also offers non-credit courses in the visual arts through its Continuing Education programs and opportunities for youth through its Community Arts Partnerships programs. For more information, visit www.collegeforcreativestudies.edu.

About Henry Ford Learning Institute

 Founded in 2003 by Ford Motor Company and The Henry Ford, Henry Ford Learning Institute is an innovative nonprofit organization that envisions a future where public education becomes a truly public endeavor, engaging a community to create vibrant educational models, leverage underutilized local resources, and remove boundaries between learning and the real world. To this end, HFLI creates innovative small schools that bring national and local community resources into the educational process and help to create thriving communities where education is everyone's responsibility. For more information on HFLI, visit www.hfli.org.

 

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